Honor & Respect: Guide to Names, Titles, Forms of Address, R. Hickey



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About the book:
HONOR & RESPECT

Abbess,
    Christian Orthodox       
Abbot,
    Christian Orthodox        
Accountant        
Acting Official       
Adjutant General     
Admiral
        

Admiral, Texas Navy   
Adventist Minister       
Alderman
        

Archbishop, Catholic        
Archbishop,
   Christian Orthodox        
Archdeacon, Episcopal        
Archimandrite        
Architect
Archpriest        
Ambassador, Goodwill
Ambassador of one country
   to another country      
Ambassador of the U.S.
   to another country
   by a U.S. citizen       
Ambassador of the U.S.
   to the U.K.  
American Indian Chief        
Assemblyman
   U.S., State / or           

   Assemblywoman            
Associate Justice,
   U.S. Supreme Court          
Associate Justice of a
   State Supreme Court
Astronaut      
Attorney
         
Attorney General           
Attorney General,
       Assistant   
Attorney, U.S.         
Australian Officials    
Awards, Name on an

Baron, Baroness           
British Officials,
   Royalty, Nobility     
Brother, Catholic
         
Brother,
   Christian Orthodox          
Bishop, Catholic            
Bishop,
   Christian Orthodox         
Bishop, Episcopal        
Board Member     
Boy        
Brigadier General       
Business Cards      

Canadian Officials    
Candidate    
Captain,
   USA, USAF, USMC     
Cardinal
             
Certificate, Name on a 
Chairman
    Federal Reserve      
Chairwoman      
Chancellor      
Chaplain in the
    Armed Services        
Chaplain of Congress          

Chargé d’Affaires         
Chief Executive Officer 
Chief Judge          
Chief Justice,
      U.S. Supreme Court 
Chief Justice, of a State
      Supreme Court             

Chief of Police          
Chief of Staff     

Chief Operating
   Officer          
Child
           
Chiropractor     
City Manager
   
Clergy & Religious
    Officials     
Club Official          
Colonel, Kentucky      
Colonel, USA, USAF,
    or USMC     
Commandant       
Commissioner, Court     
Commissioner
         
Commodore of a         
      Yacht Club         
Congressman, U.S.               
Congresswoman, U.S.   
Consul and or
   Consul General   
 
Consultant      
Corporate Executive         
Councilman
    Councilwoman      
Counselor (Diplomat)      
Countess     
County Officials       
Couples     
    U.S. Military
    U.S. Officials
    Private Citizens    
    Same Sex
Curator        

Dalai Lama          
Deacon         
Dean, academic            
Dean, clergy            
Deceased Persons        
Degree, honorary      
Delegate, U.S., State
            

Dentist             
Deputy Chief of Mission      
Deputy Marshal          
Designate,
Elect,
    Pro Tempore      
Diploma, Name on a   
Diplomats
     

Director      
District Attorney
          
Doctor, Chiropractor     
Doctor of Dentistry
          
Doctor of Medicine              
Doctor, Military           
Doctor of
   Veterinary Medicine          
Doctor, Optometrist   
Doctor of Osteopathy            
Doctor, Other Disciplines     
Doctorate        
Doctorate, honorary      

Earl            
Elect, Designate
  
Pro Tempore      
Emeritus/emerita
     
Eminence     
Emperor    
Engineer    
Esquire, Esq.       
Excellency           

Family     
Fiancee      
Firefighter    
First, Second,
   Third , etc .        
First Lady, Spouse
   of the President of
   the United States 
First Lady, Member
    of Her   
    White House Staff      
First Lady, Spouse
   of a U.S. Governor
   or Lt. Gov.    
First Lady, Spouse
   of a U.S. Mayor    

First Lady
   of a Church      

First Lieuten
ant
   
Former Officials    
Freeholder       

Gay Couple      
Geshe

General
    USA, USAF, USMC
Girl       

Goodwill Ambassador      
Governor General         
Governor, Lieuten
ant
 
Governor, Lt., Spouse   

Governor, Tribal Council          
Governor, U.S. State       
Governor, Former    
Governor
    Spouse of     
Governor's Staff,
    Member of
     
Governors, Board of 

High Commissioner    
Honorable, The
          
Honorary Ambassador       
Honorary degrees
Honorary doctorate
   
Honourable, The
   
 
   

Indian Chief         
Inspector General    
Interim Official   
Introductions       
Invitations
  
   Writing &  
   Addressing  
Invitations
   
Military:
    Writing &
    Addressing

Judge, former     
Judge of US City

     County or State     
Judge, US Federal            
Junior, Senior,
    I, II, III, etc
.       

Justice, Associate

     Federal
     Supreme Court

Justice, Associate

     State
     Supreme Court

King     
Knight      

Late, The
   (deceased persons)
       
Lawyer      
Lesbian Couple    
Lieutenant      
Lieutenant Colonel,     
   USA, USAF, USMC      
    
Lieutenant General,
   USA, USAF, USMC      

Lieutenant Governor    
     

Ma'am          
Major
   USA, USAF, USMC  
Major General,
   USA, USAF, USMC   
Man, business
          
Man, social
         
Marquess / Marchioness
 
 
Married Women       
Marshal for a
   Judicial District, U.S. 
Mayor, U.S. City   
Mayor, Canadian City    
Mayor Pro Tempore
     
Mayor, Vice    
Medic      
Minister,
   Protestant Clergy       
Miss      
Monk,
   Christian Orthodox     
Monsignor       
Most Reverend, The        
Mother Superior
    
Mr. (Social)      
Mr. (Business)      
Mrs., Ms. (Use, Social Forms)      
Mrs. vs. Ms.     
Mr. & Mrs. / Couples   
   

Name Badges or Tags     
Nobility, UK/British
       
Nobility, Other & Former     
Nun, Catholic
  
Nun, Orthodox
Nurse           

Officer, Police     
Optometrist     

Pastor, Christian Clergy  
Patriarch,
   Christian Orthodox  
Patriarch,
   Ecumenical Patriarch
   of Constantinople  
People with Two Titles      
Permanent
     Representative        
Petty Officer
      
Pharmacist     
Physician
        
PhD     
Place Cards            
Plaque, Name on a    
Police Chief
Police Officer                     
Pope, Catholic
  
Pope, Coptic
      
Postmaster General         
Post-Nominal
    Abbreviations    
Presbyter, Orthodox
   
President, corporate
President of
    College or
    University   
President of a
    Secondary
    School      
President of a
    US State Assembly 
President (current)
   of the U.S.A.          
President (former)
   of the U.S.A.     
     
President of the
    U.S.A., spouse of  
President-elect
    of the U.S.   
Priest, Catholic          
Priest,
    Christian Orthodox 
Priest, Episcopal        
Prime Minister
       
Principal      
Professionals
   & Academics         
Professor
     
Pro Tempore,
   Elect, Designate    
Psychologist      

Queen

Rabbi               
Ranger, Texas        
Representative,
   U.S., Federal           
Representative,
   U.S., State            
Reservist, Military      
Resident
    Commissioner 
Retired Military
   1. Formula For
       How to Address     
   2. Use of Rank by
       Retired Military    
 

   3. Q&A on
       How to Address
       Retired Military   
Retiree        
Reverend, The
      
Right Reverend, The         

Same Sex Couple      
Salvation Army    
School Board Member
     
Second
Lieutenant        
Secretary,
   U.S. Department,
   Member of the Cabinet
Secretary
   of Defense, U.S.       
Secretary, Assistant       
Secretary General
   of the U.N.            
Senator, U.S., Federal       
Senator, U.S., State         
Senator, Canadian       
Senior, Junior,
     I, II, III, etc.         
Senior Judge 
      
Sergeant       
Sergeant at Arms
          
Seventh Day
     Adventist Minister       
Sheriff       
Sister, Catholic       
Sir       

Solicitor General      
Speaker of the U.S.
   House of
   Representatives.           
Specialist       
Spouse of the
    President of the U.S.       
Spouse of the
    Vice President
    of the U.S.           
Spouse of an
    Elected Official            
State Attorney     
Surgeon General          

Texas Ranger        
Titles & Forms of
    Address, Useless?        
Tombstones, Names on
Town Justice
     
Town Manager       
The Honorable     
Tribal Officials     
Two Titles,
    Person With

Under Secretary    
US Attorney
       
US Federal Officials
     
US State Officials     
US Municipal Officials

Venerable, The        
Veteran (not Retired)         
Veterinarian
           
Very Reverend, The         
VFW Officer/Official    
Vice Mayor       
Vice President
    of the U.S.
Spouse of the
    Vice President
   
of the U.S.
Vice President-elect
    of the U.S.      
 
Viscount and/or
   Viscountess        

Warrant Officer       
Widow
     
White House Staff    
Woman, business        
Woman, social        

Yacht Club Officer      



Press Contact

For press information, interview, or fact check, send an e-mail to Robert Hickey. Or call The Protocol School of Washington®'s administrative office at 803-407-4177.

Video & Images

Photos of Gallery at Dubai, Abu Dhabi and Kansas City, MO. 

Panel Discussion   "The Art of Protocol" at Public Relations Society of America, Los Angeles Chapter. 8 minute edited video posted on Facebook.

Robert Hickey on Huff Post Live with Abby Huntsman. "Does Presidential Wining & Dining Work?"  I come at 13:00, 16:00, 19:45, 20:30, 22:50 minutes in the 26 minute show.

Robert Hickey on CNN Newsroom with Tony Harris and on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.

Robert Hickey on CNN International, Quest on Business

Quoted in The Media
Business Insider / June 2015

Robert Hickey exclusively interviewed in  "5 cultural faux pas Americans make while traveling abroad" by Sarah Schmalbruch. 
     "While you may not do it intentionally — or even realizing you're doing it — certain kinds of behavior that Americans wouldn't think twice about aren't as accepted or favored in other countries around the world. We spoke to Robert Hickey, the deputy director of the Protocol School of Washington, and author of "Honor and Respect: The Official Guide to Names, Titles, and Forms of Address," to find out what some of these faux pas are.  Take a look below so you know what to avoid next time you're in a foreign country."

Full text of the article in a PDF format or as a Word Document .

The Washington Post / September 2012
Robert Hickey quoted in "The Reliable Source: Title Trouble on the Hill "  Roxanne Roberts and Amy Argetsinger, September 19, 2012
     "There is a difference between an rank and a role, says Robert Hickey, deputy director at the Protocol School of Washington. 'Honorable' is a personal rank and continues with the person for life. Politicians typically use their job titles so people know exactly what they are – or were. 'Honorable' is the proper title once they leave office, he says. So, really we should be saying 'the Honorable Bill Clinton' and 'the Honorable Mitt Romney,' instead of 'President Clinton' and 'Governor Romney."
    Full Story as a PDF      

New York Magazine / June 2012
Robert Hickey quoted in "President Obama Is Calling His Opponent ‘Mr. Romney’ NowDan Amira, June 2012
     "At the same time, "Mr." is actually the more appropriate honorific here, according to Robert Hickey, deputy director of the Protocol School of Washington and author of Honor & Respect: The Official Guide to Names, Titles, and Forms of Address. On his website, he writes: Only a Governor in office is formally and officially addressed as Governor (name). The reason? There is only one Governor at a time, and it's not respectful of the current office holder to refer to former office holders as if they were still in office. I know we hear newscasters referring to former governors as "Governor."  But it is incorrect. However, even though "Mr. Romney" may be perfectly acceptable, the fact that Obama used to say "Governor Romney" exclusively makes the switch to "Mr. Romney" seem like an intentional slight. This race is getting heated, you guys."
    Full Story as a PDF     

Slate / March 2012
Robert Hickey quoted in "You Are Not the SpeakerEmily Yoffe, March 2012
     "Just think, a president returning to the life of a private citizen sans imperial retinue—how quaint. Robert Hickey, deputy director of the Protocol School of Washington and author of Honor & Respect: The Official Guide to Names, Titles, and Forms of Address writes that the rules of the road vary for former officials. Hickey says that for those who held offices filled by only one person at a time—such as president, vice president, secretary of state, and even governor or mayor—it is confusing to the public, and disrespectful to the current office holder, to hang onto the title. People with titles held concurrently by many, such as senators or judges, are not violating tradition by keeping their honorifics.
       Retaining an aura of power has obvious benefits—including being able to trade on that power. Hickey says the military is particularly sensitive to title abuse in the business world. He explains that after 20 years of service a retired officer is entitled to use his or her former rank socially, but they are not supposed to use that title in business if it can be misconstrued. A former colonel can call himself that on his daughter’s wedding invitation, for instance, but if he’s employed by Boeing, he’s supposed to be Mr. when he’s on the job. Although, Hickey adds, “Around Washington it’s very typical for defense contractors to encourage employees to use their rank.”
      Hickey says the best rule for any ex-official is, “Who are you at this moment?” If you’re a former senator who’s now a lobbyist on K Street, you should work your contacts as a private citizen, not as “senator.” (As for the use of “the Honorable,” Letitia Baldrige says it is properly affixed for life to those who have served high office at the federal, state, or local level. But the important nuance is that “the Honorable” is a way for others to describe the former official—in an introduction or on a place card, say. It’s not how exes should style themselves.)"

    Full Story as a PDF   

Conde Nast Traveler / November 2010
Robert Hickey quoted in "Etiquette 101: What GivesSara Tucker, November 2010
     "In our abundant culture, where everybody has so much, gifts don't mean as much as they do elsewhere in the world," says Robert Hickey, deputy director of the Protocol School of Washington. "A gift should be a distilled symbol of your relationship." In exchange for his gift to Brown, the president scored a first-edition biography of Winston Churchill in seven volumes, a framed commission for the H.M.S. Resolute, and a penholder. The penholder was only the latest artifact in a story going back to 1855, when the Resolute was rescued by an American whaler and later returned to England. A desk made from its timbers was presented to President Rutherford B. Hayes by Queen Victoria and has been used by American presidents ever since. The gift to Obama was crafted from the wood of the Resolute's sister ship, the Gannet, which once went on anti-slavery missions off Africa. The symbolism here is indeed exquisite. "It was only a penholder, but it was infused with meaning," says Hickey. "That was a brilliant gift."

"W" Magazine / June 2009
Robert Hickey interviewed in the Editor's Blog. "Five Minutes With A Master of Protocol" wmagazine.com, Haven Thompson, June 12, 2009
    
“The world may be flat, but people at the top of the pecking order don't think so. So if you're sitting next to a baroness, it would be fun to know what to call her. And wouldn't it be fun to have a good conversation with her?"
    Full Story as a PDF   

POLITICO / June 2009
Robert Hickey quoted in "What do you call a lawmaker, anyway?" Politico.com, Andie Coller, June 22, 2009
(TAGS: Names, Lawmakers, Respect, Name-Calling)
    
“It’s always the substance of the conversation that is the most important thing, but it is interesting how often these titles and things determine how the conversation goes,” says Hickey
    Full Story as a PDF   
    Barbara Boxer on YouTube

Press Releases

BRIDAL & WEDDING:
    How to Address Your VIP Wedding Guests? A New Resource Spells Out The Protocol Rules (April 2009) PDF

BUSINESS:
    Protocol Rules At The Top of The Pecking Order (April 2009) PDF

Robert Hickey
 
Author Photo: Brad Fowler
Book Photo: Marc Goodman


National Conference for International Visitors
       Robert Hickey has presented a number of times sessions on Protocol for the Citizen Diplomat at the NCIV conferences. Comments from participants included:
   * Excellent presentation, crisp and concise, worth repeating
   * Do this again please, He is amazing and the skills taught are so important
   * This presenter was superb. Clear, funny, educational
   * Great delivery + engaging + fun = very informative
   * The best and most useful session of the conference! Thank you so much.
   * Best session I have attended. Well delivered, fascinating and useful.
   * Very well presented. Educational session and fun. Great speaker.
   * This was an exceptional session.
   * Informative, well organized, even funny. This was a great session.

Teaching in Trindad & Tobago
   I taught a two-day
Protocol Master Class with my colleagues of The Protocol School of Washington® -- Left to right in the photo below, Jeane Anderson, Pamela Eyring, and Diane Brown -- October 25-26, 2010 in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago under the sponsorship of the Trinidad and Tobago Hospitality & Tourism Institute. Attending were more than 125 students from the country, including two cabinet ministers who brought their staffs so all would be better prepared to present the best face to citizens and visitors.
         -- Robert




Teaching in Dubai, United Arab Emirates
   I was teaching an
International Protocol Manager Training with The Protocol School of Washington® June 28-July 1, 2010 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates in a training under the patronage of The Protocol Department of His Highness the Ruler of Dubai. There were students from the U.A.E. (Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Fujairah, and Sharjah), Oman, Qatar, Lebanon, and even one who came from the U.S.A.
    Below is a photo of me on the back terrace of the Emirates Palace Abu Dhabi (with the Persian Gulf in the background). It was about 110 degrees F and very humid, so I wasn't out there for long. 
    And also there's a photo of the International Protocol Manager class on the 124th floor observation deck of the Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world in Dubai, U.A.E. I'm the tallest person, back left, wearing the red tie.
         -- Robert




     Honor & Respect
The Official Guide
to Names, Titles, and Forms of Address

By Robert Hickey

Copyright © 2016 Robert Hickey.  All Rights Reserved
Book Photo: Marc Goodman